Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
the prime minister agree that in the past when the house of commons has been faced with big issues that they have a tendency for knee-jerk overreactions? would you agree that newspapers are a force for good in this country and we need criminality weeded out of the media but not impose on a free speech or prepress? >> my hon. friend is entirely right. we need to make sure as the house of commons, as the government, in the debate that we have to show an element of restraint in regulation of the media because there's always a danger that the pendulum will swing too far the other way and we threaten investigative journalism, a strong and independent media that can hold government to account. when we consider some of the scandals that have been uncovered, it is often the press that does this. it is absolutely vital to maintain their british tradition. >> rebekah brooks described the prime minister as a friend and neighbor. we heard about christmas walks and conversations. >> order. this is the moment in parliament where we have a free speech. this question will be heard. that is the end
old. what are your hopes for the future? >> there's a big future. there's a deep future. the one that want for. so that is the future where we are all able to freely communicate our hearts and dreams, share information about the world with each other and the historical record is an item that is completely sack sacrosanct. it would never be changed, never be modified, never be deleted, and that we will steer of course away from the victim of he who controls the purses present controls the past. so that is something that is my life long quest to do. and from that, justice flows because most of us have an instinct for justice and most of us are reasonably intelligent. and if we can communicate with each other, organize and not be op pressed and not know what's going on pretty much the rest falls out. in the short term, it is that my staff stop hasling me to tell me to go. >> >> i wish you all the bevs another even more beautiful mission. [applause] >> here is a look at our schedule for this afternoon. next, a discussion with legal scholars on the 2010-2011 supreme court term and wha
. it is a mixture of big and small airports that go into the best practices in terms of what's appropriate for each airport. >> i have a lot of precedent in a limited amount of time. you're talking about baggage screening equipment. the airport i use the most is in corpus christi. we have american and continental, three regional jets, southwest with 737's. each airline has a screening machines staffed by two tsa agents. we bought three machines for the corpus christi airport. probably a fourth one, because delta used to be there. why could there not be just one? there are never that many people there. do we have any idea why we are spending multiple -- thata has a program they're trying to move toward, optimal solutions for each airport. they are trying to remove the stand-alone machines and use more efficient systems or even so-called in-line systems, which require less personnel to operate. i am not sure if that particular airport is on track to get that system. >> one of the things i hear consistently from my constituents -- try saying that three times fast -- is why don't we faller -- follow mo
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3